SERIES INFO

 

NASCAR Camping World Grand National Division
East Series ·  West Series

The NASCAR Grand National Division consists of two series, on opposite coasts but operating under identical rules – the Busch East Series and the AutoZone West Series. The series has been a launching pad for the careers of many drivers.

NASCAR Grand National Division cars are similar to those used on the NASCAR Busch Series and Nextel Cup Series. They are powered by 350 to 358 cubic-inch V-8 engines with a maximum compression ratio of 12:1. Both 105- and 110-inch wheelbase cars are allowed, with a minimum weight of 3,300 pounds. They are equipped with Goodyear bias-ply tires.

The AutoZone West Series enters its 55th season in 2008, making it the West Coast’s oldest stock car racing circuit. The AutoZone West Series competes on paved oval race tracks ranging from ¼ mile to 2.0 miles in length and in 2008 will compete on the 1.9 mile Infineon Raceway Road Course. Races typically are held throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Texas, Colorado and Arizona. Four events in the 2006 season will be held in conjunction with one or all of NASCARs top three series, Nextel Cup, Busch and Craftsman Truck.

Attendance for stand alone short track events averages between 5,000 to 12,000. Attendance for stand alone superspeedway (1.0 mile or larger) events averages between 10,000 to 30,000. Attendance for races held in conjunction with one of the top three Nascar Series averages between 20,000 and 40,000. These events typically have more than 200,000 fans pass through the race track throughout the three to four day events.

Most events are televised live on HDNET which receives an average Nielsen rating of .4 (440,800 households) and are replayed on Speed Channel with a .2 (220,400 households) rating.

 

ARCA (Auto Racing Club of America)
RE/MAX Series

 The ARCA RE/MAX Series, in its 56th year of competition, enjoys record car counts, with 155 different teams and 201 different drivers competing in the series over the course of the 23-race schedule.

ARCA Series cars are virtually identical to those used on the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series. They are powered by 350 to 358 cubic-inch V-8 engines with approximately 850 horsepower. The cars have a 110 inch wheelbase, with a minimum weight of 3,500 pounds. They are equipped with Hoosier Radial tires.

The series has been a launching pad for the careers of many drivers and is considered the true stepping stone to NASCARs top three series due to its use of identical cars to the Nextel Cup Series as well as competing on many of the same tracks giving teams and drivers great experience with the same types of cars and tracks.

The ARCA RE/MAX Series competes on wide variety of race tracks including both Dirt and Paved ovals ranging from ½  mile to 2.5 miles in length. Races are held throughout the states of Florida, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Alabama, Kansas and Missouri. Eleven events in the 2008 season will be held in conjunction with one or more of NASCARs top three series, Nextel Cup, Busch or Craftsman Truck and one event will be held in conjunction with an Indy Racing League (IRL) event.

Attendance for stand alone short track events averages between 8,000 to 20,000. Attendance for stand alone superspeedway (1.0 mile or larger) events averages between 10,000 to 40,000. Attendance for races held in conjunction with one of the top three Nascar Series averages between 20,000 and 50,000. These events typically have more than 200,000 fans pass through the race track throughout the three to four day events.

Most events are televised live on Speed Channel which receives an average Nielsen rating of .6 (661,200 households) and are also replayed on Speed Channel with a .3 (330,600 households) rating.

NASCAR AutoZone Elite Division
Midwest Series · Northwest Series · Southeast Series · Southwest Series

Four separate series – using identical race cars – comprise this division, which is designed to serve as a local driver’s first step towards NASCAR’s three national series. The four participating series compete on short tracks, superspeedways and road courses, providing opportunities for teams and drivers to sharpen their skills and work towards their career goals. AutoZone, the nation’s leading auto parts retailer, joined as the title sponsor of this division beginning in 2004.

The NASCAR AutoZone Elite Division features 2,900-pound race cars using metal or fiberglass bodies, powered by 350 to 358 cubic-inch engines. The cars have a wheelbase between 101 and 105 inches and are driven on Hoosier bias-ply racing tires.

Midwest Series events are scheduled primarily throughout Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and as far West as Colorado. Many of the region’s top racers have competed in this series, including 2003 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series Raybestos Rookie-of-the-Year Jamie McMurray and 2003 NASCAR Craftsman Series champion Travis Kvapil.

Stretching across Washington, Idaho and Montana, the Northwest Series was originally founded in 1985, making it one of the oldest of the four series in the NASCAR AutoZone Elite Division. 2002 NASCAR Busch Series champion Greg Biffle was a standout competitor on the Northwest Series in the late 1990s.

The Southeast Series covers Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina as its home territory. Matt Kenseth used this series – formerly known as the All Pro Series – as a stepping stone during his rise to stardom in the late 1990s. Rick Crawford, Bobby Hamilton Jr., Jason Keller, David Reutimann and Scott Riggs have also competed in the Southeast Series during the early stages of their NASCAR careers.

The Southwest Series covers Arizona and California, while also venturing into Colorado for select events. 2004 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series champion Kurt Busch was the 1999 Southwest Series champion, while Kevin Harvick, Matt Crafton and Ron Hornaday Jr. are also among this series’ most famous alumni.

The series features tracks of all makes, ranging from 1/4 mile bullrings up to 1.5 mile superspeedways. And also includes stops at some road course venues, most notably at Infineon Raceway. Several races are held in conjunction with the NASCAR Cup,  Busch and Truck Series. 

NASCAR Whelen Weekly Racing Series
Super Late Model Division – Toyota Speedway at Irwindale

NASCAR Dodge Weekly Series tracks are grouped into one of four Divisions – Division I, II, III or IV. The Divisions are not based on geography or types of cars, and each Division includes a variety of tracks. The Divisions are equally weighted; drivers in each Division are eligible for the same point fund awards.

Drivers compete in 16 to 20 events at their home track in the “feature class.” Drivers in those classes will be eligible for the NASCAR Dodge Weekly Series Divisional and National championships.

Drivers in the top class collect NASCAR points in each NASCAR-sanctioned event from Jan. 1-Oct. 1, 2008. NASCAR points are awarded per section 17 of the NASCAR Whelen Weekly Series rule book.

Toyota Speedway is the local track to the Los Angeles Area and is a nine year new, state-of-the-art, motorsports facility. It features 6,000 seats, twin paved oval race tracks (banked 1/2 and 1/3 mile). The 1/2 mile track consists of progressive banking with three distinct grooves, providing for some of the best, side-by-side, three wide short track racing in the country. The track hosts weekly events for a wide variety of cars, from Stock Cars, Sprint Cars, Midgets, Supermodifieds, Legends and Trucks.